//Dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement show the dangers of high temperatures for pets

Dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement show the dangers of high temperatures for pets

As <a href=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6842316/uk-weather-forecast-latest-hottest-day-year-britain-roads-melt-temperatures/” data-mce-href=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6842316/uk-weather-forecast-latest-hottest-day-year-britain-roads-melt-temperatures/”>the hottest day of the year</a> in the UK just passed, temperatures of 33.3C (92F) were recorded. This record was captured in Santon Downham, Suffolk. However, it’s expected to be exceeded – temperatures for next week are expected to reach 35C (95F) and more. And as a dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement show, these temperatures present a lot of dangers.Leaving your dog in your car at noon is not the only foolish thing you can do to your pooch anymore.With temperatures continuing to rise, the dangers for our pets and ourselves are multiplying. Under these temperatures, the backing tarmac reaches melting point and ignoring or disregarding this can cause your dog a lot of pain.The Twitter user @Zucchinisaurus is the one who posted the shocking photo of their pup’s burnt paws. The photo was intended as a warning of the dangers of the hot weather to dogs.They wrote: “<em>Before you take your dog for a walk in hot weather, take off your shoes / socks and stand on the pavement.</em><em>”If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your dog!”.</em>Another post shared by <a href=”https://twitter.com/keeleyspetserv?lang=en” data-mce-href=”https://twitter.com/keeleyspetserv?lang=en”>pet welfare account Keeley’s Pet Service</a> further elaborates on how hot pavements can reach such temperatures.They state that when temperatures reach 31C the asphalt can get as hot as 62C.The <a href=”https://www.rspca.org.uk/home” data-mce-href=”https://www.rspca.org.uk/home”>RSPCA</a> advices people to only walk their dogs early in the morning or in the evening “<em>when they will not burn their paws on the pavement or be at increased risk of heatstroke</em>”.<dl id=”attachment_1262″ class=”wp-caption alignright” style=”width: 320px;” data-mce-style=”width: 320px;”><dt class=”wp-caption-dt”><img class=”size-medium wp-image-1262″ src=”https://dogsloveusmore.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442-320×188.jpg” alt=”” width=”320″ height=”188″ data-mce-src=”https://dogsloveusmore.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442-320×188.jpg” /></dt><dd class=”wp-caption-dd”>Source: Berens J. Thermal, Journal of the American Medical Association.<br />https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442.jpg?w=960</dd></dl>It’s also important to be vigilant and mindful that your dog might be in pain. These include things such as limping, licking their feet, or having blistered red or darkened pads.Another danger for pets is that of heat strokes. To avoid those you should watch out for heavy panting, vomiting, and red or dark gums and the dog’s tongue.If your pet exhibits any of these signs make sure to give him cool (not cold) water to drink, as well as to pour cool water over them. And if you feel like this borders on needless fear, look at that dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement again.

As the hottest day of the year in the UK just passed, temperatures of 33.3C (92F) were recorded. This record was captured in Santon Downham, Suffolk. However, it’s expected to be exceeded – temperatures for next week are expected to reach 35C (95F) and more. And as a dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement show, these temperatures present a lot of dangers.

Leaving your dog in your car at noon is not the only foolish thing you can do to your pooch anymore.

With temperatures continuing to rise, the dangers for our pets and ourselves are multiplying. Under these temperatures, the backing tarmac reaches melting point and ignoring or disregarding this can cause your dog a lot of pain.

The Twitter user @Zucchinisaurus is the one who posted the shocking photo of their pup’s burnt paws. The photo was intended as a warning of the dangers of the hot weather to dogs.

They wrote: “Before you take your dog for a walk in hot weather, take off your shoes / socks and stand on the pavement.

“If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your dog!”.

Another post shared by pet welfare account Keeley’s Pet Service further elaborates on how hot pavements can reach such temperatures.

They state that when temperatures reach 31C the asphalt can get as hot as 62C.

The RSPCA advices people to only walk their dogs early in the morning or in the evening “when they will not burn their paws on the pavement or be at increased risk of heatstroke“.

Source: Berens J. Thermal, Journal of the American Medical Association.
https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442.jpg?w=960

It’s also important to be vigilant and mindful that your dog might be in pain. These include things such as limping, licking their feet, or having blistered red or darkened pads.

Another danger for pets is that of heat strokes. To avoid those you should watch out for heavy panting, vomiting, and red or dark gums and the dog’s tongue.

If your pet exhibits any of these signs make sure to give him cool (not cold) water to drink, as well as to pour cool water over them. And if you feel like this borders on needless fear, look at that dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement again.

2019-08-11T02:50:04+00:00By |Daily Scoop|0 Comments

As <a href=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6842316/uk-weather-forecast-latest-hottest-day-year-britain-roads-melt-temperatures/” data-mce-href=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6842316/uk-weather-forecast-latest-hottest-day-year-britain-roads-melt-temperatures/”>the hottest day of the year</a> in the UK just passed, temperatures of 33.3C (92F) were recorded. This record was captured in Santon Downham, Suffolk. However, it’s expected to be exceeded – temperatures for next week are expected to reach 35C (95F) and more. And as a dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement show, these temperatures present a lot of dangers.Leaving your dog in your car at noon is not the only foolish thing you can do to your pooch anymore.With temperatures continuing to rise, the dangers for our pets and ourselves are multiplying. Under these temperatures, the backing tarmac reaches melting point and ignoring or disregarding this can cause your dog a lot of pain.The Twitter user @Zucchinisaurus is the one who posted the shocking photo of their pup’s burnt paws. The photo was intended as a warning of the dangers of the hot weather to dogs.They wrote: “<em>Before you take your dog for a walk in hot weather, take off your shoes / socks and stand on the pavement.</em><em>”If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your dog!”.</em>Another post shared by <a href=”https://twitter.com/keeleyspetserv?lang=en” data-mce-href=”https://twitter.com/keeleyspetserv?lang=en”>pet welfare account Keeley’s Pet Service</a> further elaborates on how hot pavements can reach such temperatures.They state that when temperatures reach 31C the asphalt can get as hot as 62C.The <a href=”https://www.rspca.org.uk/home” data-mce-href=”https://www.rspca.org.uk/home”>RSPCA</a> advices people to only walk their dogs early in the morning or in the evening “<em>when they will not burn their paws on the pavement or be at increased risk of heatstroke</em>”.<dl id=”attachment_1262″ class=”wp-caption alignright” style=”width: 320px;” data-mce-style=”width: 320px;”><dt class=”wp-caption-dt”><img class=”size-medium wp-image-1262″ src=”https://dogsloveusmore.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442-320×188.jpg” alt=”” width=”320″ height=”188″ data-mce-src=”https://dogsloveusmore.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442-320×188.jpg” /></dt><dd class=”wp-caption-dd”>Source: Berens J. Thermal, Journal of the American Medical Association.<br />https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/NINTCHDBPICT000422467339-e1532379777442.jpg?w=960</dd></dl>It’s also important to be vigilant and mindful that your dog might be in pain. These include things such as limping, licking their feet, or having blistered red or darkened pads.Another danger for pets is that of heat strokes. To avoid those you should watch out for heavy panting, vomiting, and red or dark gums and the dog’s tongue.If your pet exhibits any of these signs make sure to give him cool (not cold) water to drink, as well as to pour cool water over them. And if you feel like this borders on needless fear, look at that dog’s burnt paws on the searing hot pavement again.

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